Wordsmith.org: the magic of words


A.Word.A.Day

About | Media | Search | Contact  


Home

Today's Word

Subscribe

Archives



Apr 2, 2021
This week’s theme
Places that have given us multiple toponyms

This week’s words
coventrate
Roman holiday
canter
Trojan
Kentish fire

This week’s comments
AWADmail 979

Next week’s theme
Eponyms
Bookmark and Share Facebook Twitter Digg MySpace Bookmark and Share
A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

Kentish fire

PRONUNCIATION:
(KEN-tish fyr)

MEANING:
noun: Prolonged cheering.

ETYMOLOGY:
From the prolonged derisive cheering in opposition to meetings held in Kent, England, during 1828-29 regarding the Catholic Relief Bill which sought to remove discrimination against Catholics. Earliest documented use: 1834.

USAGE:
“Then Kim would join the Kentish-fire of good wishes and bad jokes, wishing the couple a hundred sons and no daughters, as the saying is.”
Rudyard Kipling; Kim; Macmillan; 1901.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
How far should one accept the rules of the society in which one lives? To put it another way: at what point does conformity become corruption? Only by answering such questions does the conscience truly define itself. -Kenneth Tynan, theater critic and author (2 Apr 1927-1980)

We need your help

Help us continue to spread the magic of words to readers everywhere

Donate

Subscriber Services
Awards | Stats | Links | Privacy Policy
Contribute | Advertise

© 1994-2021 Wordsmith