Wordsmith.Org


A.Word.A.Day

About Us | What's New | Search | Site Map | Contact Us  


Home

Today's Word

Yesterday's Word

Archives

FAQ


Apr 6, 2009
This week's theme
People who have more than one word coined after them

This week's words
ciceronian
maudlin
hermetic
Cadmean victory
pickwickian

Marcus Tullius Cicero
A bust of Cicero at the Capitoline Museums, Rome
Photo: antmoose

Discuss
Feedback
RSS/XML
A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

Winning even one Nobel Prize is a big deal. Marie Curie received two (in physics and chemistry). But then hers was a family of high achievers: her husband, their daughter, and their son-in-law were also Nobel laureates.

Similarly, having one's name turned into a word in the language is a rare feat. Yet there are some, both real and fictional characters, who have accomplished this more than once. This week we feature five such people.

And Marie, well, she too had had two words coined after her: Curie, a unit of radioactivity, and curium, a radioactive element.

ciceronian

PRONUNCIATION:
(sis-uh-RO-nee-uhn)

MEANING:
adjective: In the style of Cicero, marked by ornate language, expansive flow, forcefulness of expression, etc.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Marcus Tullius Cicero, Roman statesman, orator, and writer (106-43 BCE). Another eponym derived from Cicero's name is cicerone (a tour guide).

USAGE:
"Oxford University mooted the idea of establishing a business school six years ago, prompting 500 black-gowned dons to storm into the 17th-century Sheldonian Theatre in protest. Harvard's business school dates from 1908. Cambridge succumbed in 1990. But outraged Oxonians unleashed volleys of Ciceronian oratory, arguing that the groves of academe should be out of bounds to commerce."
Tara Pepper; Oxford's Business Blues; Newsweek (New York); Sep 2, 2002.

"Voices in the wilderness rarely speak in perfect Ciceronian cadences; why must we call (Edward Durell) Stone's work to such strict account?"
James Trilling; A Piece of History; The New York Times; Apr 16, 2000.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Some men of a secluded and studious life have sent forth from their closet or their cloister, rays of intellectual light that have agitated courts and revolutionized kingdoms; like the moon which, though far removed from the ocean, and shining upon it with a serene and sober light, is the chief cause of all those ebbings and flowings which incessantly disturb that restless world of waters. -Charles Caleb Colton, author and clergyman (1780-1832)

A.Word.A.Day by email:

Subscribe

"The most welcomed, most enduring piece of daily mass e-mail in cyberspace."

The New York Times

Sponsored by:

Give the Gift of Words

Share the magic of words. Send a gift subscription of A.Word.A.Day.

Anu on Words:
Writer Magazine
Globe & Mail

Interact:

Bulletin board
Wordsmith Talk

Moderated Chat
Wordsmith Chat

Readers' Voice
AWADmail

Subscriber Services
Awards | Stats | Links | Privacy Policy
Contribute | Advertise

© 2014 Wordsmith