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Jan 19, 2018
This week’s theme
Words of nautical origins

This week’s words
copper-bottomed
flotsam
leeway
jetsam
groggy

groggy
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

groggy

PRONUNCIATION:
(GROG-ee)

MEANING:
adjective: Dazed, weak, or unsteady, as from lack of sleep, tiredness, sickness, intoxication, etc.

ETYMOLOGY:
After Old Grog, nickname of Admiral Edward Vernon (1684-1757), who ordered diluted rum to be served to his sailors (and thus helped coin the term grog). The admiral earned the nickname from his habit of wearing a grogram cloak. Grogram is a coarse fabric of silk, wool, mohair, or a blend of them. The word grogram is from French gros grain (large grain or texture). Earliest documented use: 1770.

USAGE:
“It kept the kids awake at night and left them groggy all the next day at school.”
William B. McCloskey; Warriors: A Novel; Skyhorse Publishing; 2017.

See more usage examples of groggy in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
On stage, I make love to 25,000 different people, then I go home alone. -Janis Joplin, singer-songwriter (19 Jan 1943-1970)

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