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Oct 30, 2014
This week's theme
Rhetorical devices

This week's words
antimetabole
zeugma
synecdoche
epanalepsis
hendiadys

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

epanalepsis

PRONUNCIATION:
(ep-uh-nuh-LEP-sis)

MEANING:
noun: A figure of speech in which a word or phrase is repeated after intervening text.
Example: "The king is dead, long live the king!"

ETYMOLOGY:
From Greek epanalepsis, from epi- (upon) + ana- (back) + lepsis (taking hold). Earliest documented use: 1584.

USAGE:
"What's it called if a word that appears at the beginning of a sentence is repeated at its end? Epanalepsis. Think of Brutus's speech at the funeral of Julius Caesar (in Shakespeare's revision, of course): 'Hear me for my cause, and be silent that you may hear: Believe me for mine honor, and have respect to mine honor, that you may believe.'"
Bryan A. Garner; For the Word Lovers; ABA Journal (Chicago); May 2013.

See more usage examples of epanalepsis in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Great literature is simply language charged with meaning to the utmost possible degree. -Ezra Pound, poet (1885-1972)

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