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Jun 21, 2018
This week’s theme
Coined words

This week’s words
kinesics
agnostic
googol
inscape
blurb

inscape
Gerard Manley Hopkins
Photo: Wikimedia Commons

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

inscape

PRONUNCIATION:
(IN-skayp)

MEANING:
noun: The unique essence of a person, place, or thing, especially as expressed in a work of art such as a poem.

ETYMOLOGY:
Coined by the poet and priest Gerard Manley Hopkins (1844-1889) who, in turn, was inspired by the philosopher Duns Scotus (c. 1266-1308). Earliest documented use: 1868.

USAGE:
“McCabe has said that ‘I’ve always felt that naturalism or social realism only provides a third of the story ... [it] gives you the marble but not the inscape of the statue.’”
Patrick McCabe; The Butcher Boy; Picador; 2015.

See more usage examples of inscape in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
I shall live badly if I do not write, and I shall write badly if I do not live. -Francoise Sagan, playwright and novelist (21 Jun 1935-2004)

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