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Jun 10, 2013
This week's theme
Miscellaneous words

This week's words
canorous
prosaic
expansive
animadversion
sempiternal

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

This week we'll feature a potpourri of words. We opened a dictionary, shook it gently, and five words fell out. They came in all shapes, sizes, and senses. They're short and long. They're flighty and grouchy. Call 'em what you will, a medley of words, a farrago, or a gallimaufry. They're disparate, they're diverse. They're varied and variegated, unclassified and unsorted. And they're all ready for use.

canorous

PRONUNCIATION:
(kuh-NOR-uhs, KAN-uhr-uhs)

MEANING:
adjective: Melodious; musical.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin canere (to sing). Ultimately from the Indo-European root kan- (to sing) which also gave us hen, canto, cantor, recant, accent, chant, enchant, and incentive. Earliest documented use: 1646.

USAGE:
"The canorous sounds ... provided a cheery moment."
Corrie Perkin; Off to an Opening in Earnest; The Australian (Sydney); Oct 13, 2008.

See more usage examples of canorous in Vocabulary.com's dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Show me a sane man and I will cure him for you. -Carl Jung, psychiatrist (1875-1961)

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