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Oct 1, 2015
This week’s theme
Short words

This week’s words
dint
moil
guff
weft
quaff

warp and weft
Photo: Wikimedia

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

weft

PRONUNCIATION:
(weft)

MEANING:
noun: The threads that run across the width of a woven fabric and are interlaced through the warp (threads that run lengthwise).

ETYMOLOGY:
From Old English wefta (weft). Ultimately from the Indo-European root webh- (to weave; to move quickly), which also gave us weave, webster, waffle, wave, waver, and wobble. Earliest documented use: 725.

USAGE:
“Keevy has woven the threads of jealousy, love, fear, and belonging into a strong weft of intimacy.”
The Ties That Bind Us Can Be Gossamer Thin; Cape Times (Cape Town, South Africa); May 20, 2015.

“It is part of the warp and weft, the action and reaction, of team sport.”
Will Tipperary Hurlers Crack Waterford Code?; Irish Examiner (Cork, Ireland); Apr 18, 2015.

See more usage examples of weft in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
For there is no friend like a sister / In calm or stormy weather; / To cheer one on the tedious way, / To fetch one if one goes astray, / To lift one if one totters down, / To strengthen whilst one stands. -Christina Rossetti, poet (1830-1894)

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