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Sep 6, 2019
This week’s theme
Coined words

This week’s words
unbirthday
runcible
chirality
esemplastic
gonzo

gonzo
Gonzo fist (two thumbs and four fingers holding a peyote button)
A symbol of gonzo journalism
Image: Notwist / Wikimedia Commons

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

gonzo

PRONUNCIATION:
(GON-zo)

MEANING:
adjective: Having a bizarre, subjective, idiosyncratic style, especially in journalism.

ETYMOLOGY:
Coined by Bill Cardoso, journalist and author, in 1971. It was first used in a published work by Hunter S. Thompson, journalist and author (1939-2005). Perhaps from Italian gonzo (simpleton) or Spanish ganso (dull or fool, literally a goose). Earliest documented use: 1971.

USAGE:
“Hendrix, backed by his new band Gypsy Sun and Rainbows, launched into a fierce two-hour set that produced one of the greatest filmed moments of the 60s: his gonzo rendition of The Star-Spangled Banner.”
Douglas Brinkley; Rocking the Revolution; The Australian (Canberra); Aug 16, 2019.

See more usage examples of gonzo in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
When people are fanatically dedicated to political or religious faiths or any other kind of dogmas or goals, it's always because these dogmas or goals are in doubt. -Robert M. Pirsig, author and philosopher (6 Sep 1928-2017)

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