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Jan 30, 2015
This week’s theme
Words for diseases, used metaphorically

This week’s words
scurvy
apoplectic
jaundiced
metastasize
scabrous

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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

scabrous

PRONUNCIATION:
(SKAB-ruhs)

MEANING:
adjective:
1. Rough: having small raised dots or scales.
2. Salacious.
3. Difficult to deal with; knotty.

ETYMOLOGY:
From Latin scaber (rough). Earliest documented use: 1585.

USAGE:
“There is nothing heartwarming or syrupy about Filth, a brash adaptation of Irvine Welsh’s scabrous 1998 third novel.”
David Archibald; Why There’s More to Scottish Cinema Than Dour Miserablism; Financial Times (London, UK); Sep 27, 2013.

See more usage examples of scabrous in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Without books the development of civilization would have been impossible. They are the engines of change, windows on the world, "Lighthouses" as the poet said "erected in the sea of time." They are companions, teachers, magicians, bankers of the treasures of the mind, Books are humanity in print. -Arthur Schopenhauer, philosopher (1788-1860)

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