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Sep 10, 2015
This week’s theme
Characters from Don Quixote who became words

This week’s words
quixote
sancho
dulcinea
lothario
rosinante

Lothario
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A.Word.A.Day
with Anu Garg

Lothario

PRONUNCIATION:
(lo-THAR-ee-o)

MEANING:
noun: A man who indiscriminately seduces women.

ETYMOLOGY:
While the word was popularized after Lothario, a character in the play The Fair Penitent (1703), it first appeared in Don Quixote in which nobleman Anselmo tests his wife’s fidelity by recruiting his friend Lothario to seduce her. Earliest documented use: 1756.

USAGE:
“Chad Everett played an aging lothario who engages in a steamy audition with a young ingenue.”
People; Bozeman Daily Chronicle (Montana); Jul 25, 2012.

See more usage examples of Lothario in Vocabulary.com’s dictionary.

A THOUGHT FOR TODAY:
Our memories are card indexes consulted and then returned in disorder by authorities whom we do not control. -Cyril Connolly, critic and editor (10 Sep 1903-1974)

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